Today's Reading List
November 23rd, 2011
11:34 AM ET

Today's Reading List

Here’s what the editors of Schools of Thought are reading today:

Sacramento Bee: Chancellor Katehi apologizes to protesters for UC Davis pepper-spraying
University of California, Davis campus police sprayed protesters last Friday. The school's police chief and two police officers have been placed on leave, while UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi apologized amidst calls for her to step down.

Orlando Sentinel: No middle school phys ed?
A Florida state representative says that his proposal to strip physical education mandates would give school districts flexibility and save money. Florida’s last governor beefed up the state’s physical education requirements, once ranked among the weakest in the U.S.

Indystar.com: Teacher's view: Tears are part of my job
A middle school teacher reveals the emotional lessons she learned during her first year in the classroom.

New York Times: Online High Schools Attracting Elite Names
Some colleges are issuing high school diplomas to students who complete coursework virtually.

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Filed under: College • Policy • Practice • Teachers • Today's Reading List
Legendary football coach values the game itself over attention and money
Coach John Gagliardi watches as his team, the St. John's Johnnies, plays Hamline University on Saturday, November 12, in St. Paul, Minnesota. St. John's routed Hamline, 61-0.
November 23rd, 2011
08:20 AM ET

Legendary football coach values the game itself over attention and money

By Chris Welch, CNN

Collegeville, Minnesota (CNN) - John Gagliardi knows a thing or two about football. He’s 85 years old, and he’s been coaching since he was in his teens.

“Because of WWII, when I was a high school senior, my coach got drafted, and we didn’t have any coaches in the town,” he recalls.

That’s when he took over.

Now, more than 60 years later, Gagliardi hasn’t stopped. Since 1953, he's been the head football coach at St. John’s University, a small liberal arts college outside of St. Cloud, Minnesota.

He’s the winningest coach in college football history — all divisions included — and the first active head coach to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.
FULL POST

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Filed under: College • Extracurricular • Practice • Sports
November 23rd, 2011
08:05 AM ET

Mykleby: Citizens must commit to our national reserve: the education of our children

Courtesy Mark MyklebyEditor’s note:  Mark Mykleby, a retired U.S. Marine Corps colonel, was an assistant to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from July 2009 until April 2011.  He retired from the Marine Corps in August 2011 and has joined LRN, a company dedicated to building values-based cultures that inspire principled performance in business and in life.

By Mark Mykleby, Special to CNN

In military operations, a commander commits his reserve forces as a bid for success.  Committing the reserve is the “all in” move to seize the initiative to achieve a desired end.

Today, education is our national reserve. It’s our bid for success.  This is the conclusion that Capt. Wayne Porter and I came to while we were special strategic assistants to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and when asked to consider what a grand strategy for our nation would look like.  The outcome of our efforts was not a “grand strategy” per se.  What we came up with was a story we called A National Strategic Narrative.  As part of that story, we said that our nation’s No. 1 strategic priority has to be education, since it is through the education of our kids that our nation will be able to compete in, and influence, the strategic environment of the future.

Admittedly, military analogies are overused today. But given our national condition – political and economic paralysis perpetuated by calcified ideologies, social dysfunction spawned by cultural and litigious excess, ecological depletion at a scale never before seen and a general cynicism for all things civic minded – the analogy of committing our reserve seems fitting because we are at a time when we need to act decisively now and go “all in” on education if we are to have any chance of redirecting our nation’s future.

Listen as CNN's John Lisk talks to Captain Wayne Porter and Retired USMC Col. Mark Mykleby, authors of "The National Strategic Narrative."/
But going “all in” doesn’t mean we just buy our way to better education. As was highlighted by Bill Gates on Fareed Zakaria’s November 6 "GPS" show, we have doubled the amount of money thrown at education over the past 30 years.  And still, our national education performance has declined.

FULL POST

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Filed under: Voices
November 23rd, 2011
08:01 AM ET

4 more accused of taking college admission exams for students

(CNN) - More Long Island students were arrested Tuesday in an ongoing investigation of a college admission exam cheating scandal that has expanded to include the ACT, according to prosecutors in New York's Nassau County.

"Our office exposed a gaping hole in standardized test security," District Attorney Kathleen Rice said.

The investigation unveiled nine students who paid four men to take the SAT or ACT standardized exams for them between 2008 and 2011.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Policy • Testing
Florida A&M band suspended after suspected hazing death
Florida A&M University student Robert Champion, 26, became ill and died Saturday night.
November 23rd, 2011
07:20 AM ET

Florida A&M band suspended after suspected hazing death

(CNN) - A Florida university has stopped all band performances amid an investigation into the death of a student over the weekend that authorities say is linked to hazing.

Robert Champion, a 26-year-old drum major with Florida A&M University's marching band, became ill and died Saturday night after a game, the Orange County, Florida, Sheriff's Office said.

Investigators have found that hazing was involved in the incident, Orange County Sheriff Jerry Demings said Tuesday.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: College • Extracurricular
Today's Reading List
November 22nd, 2011
12:05 PM ET

Today's Reading List

Here’s what the editors of Schools of Thought are reading today:

WSVN-TV (Miami/Fort Lauderdale): Alleged bullying victim files suit against school district
A mother files suit against the Broward County School District after she says her daughter was bullied and complaints to the school were not addressed.

U.S. News & World Report: Counselors Say Schools' Missions are Misguided
According to a new survey by the College Board, guidance counselors believe that they are not being used effectively to help promote student achievement.

Indystar.com: Bridging cultural divide between teachers, students
"Cultural competency" training is being used to help teachers connect with students of different cultures and backgrounds.

San Antonio Express-News: Teachers go online to meet classroom needs
Teachers across the country can use the Internet to find funding for classroom supplies and equipment.

St. Louis Today: Vets returning to college face unique challenges
American colleges and universities expect to see a surge in enrollment as veterans return home. Some experts warn that many colleges aren't ready as these former service members transition from battlefields to college campuses.

Teachable moments in the news: Occupy Wall Street protests
The scene in downtown Manhattan as thousands get ready to march over the Brooklyn bridge on November 17, 2011.
November 22nd, 2011
08:08 AM ET

Teachable moments in the news: Occupy Wall Street protests

Editor’s note: As curriculum writers and journalists, we think there are teachable moments in almost everything that’s going on. In this ongoing series, we’ll take a look at individual news stories as they develop and give teachers and parents some ideas on how to approach them with your kids.

By Donna Krache, CNN

You might be in front of a classroom full of ninth-graders, or there might be protests in your community that prompt a discussion among students. There’s an opportunity to both connect what students are learning to real-world events and encourage them to think critically as they formulate opinions. One way to do that is to ask them questions that dovetail into what they are learning in class. Here are some suggestions in different subject areas to get you started:

Civics/Government: Why do Americans have the right to protest? What do you know about the 1st Amendment? What are some of the responsibilities associated with the rights we have?

U.S. and World History: What other movements in history have you studied? What political or economic events set the stage for these? Which movements were most successful in creating change? Why?

Media literacy: What do you think is the message behind these protests and who is producing it? Where would you go to get information about what is going on? How do you decide what information is credible?

You can also use the story to guide students on how to formulate opinions based on information. You could ask questions like: Do you have an opinion on the protests? If you don’t, how would you go about forming one? What kinds of information would you look for to prepare you to come to a conclusion? If you have an opinion on this story, what factors helped to shape your view?

For cost-free, commercial-free news produced for middle and high school classrooms, check out CNN Student News.

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Filed under: Practice • Resources
November 21st, 2011
02:41 PM ET

iReport: Kingwood TX High School Students Give Thanks and Love to Bullied Teacher

CNN PRODUCER NOTE :    EWillies1961 filmed a heartwarming moment as about 75 students from Kingwood High School in Texas paid a visit to a teacher who had been bullied this week. 'What happened was the teacher was teaching the class and he had a few louder students, one in particular. That student said, 'You're old and you’re going to die any day," explained Willies. The students went over to Mr. Love's house last night at presented him with a card, gifts and even serenaded him with 'All You Need is Love' by the Beatles. 'It just showed the humanity of young kids here in Kingwood, Texas. We still have good kids. This was completely kid driven.' – zdan, CNN iReport producer

iReport — 50 to 60 or more Kingwood TX High School students visited their Teacher Mr. Love to give their love and support. The Teacher had a bad week with a very few students verbally bullying him with unkind words. Jason, got several scores of Kingwood students to show their appreciation for the teacher. Mr. Love showed both shock and extreme appreciation.

It is heartening to see young students show this type of affection to their teacher. As Mr. Love said, these students could be doing much more fun things on a Sunday evening. That they felt the need to give Mr. Love some love after the less than ideal week proves that goodness still reigns in most of us.

FULL STORY
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Filed under: Extracurricular • High school • iReport • Teachers
Today's Reading List
November 21st, 2011
11:37 AM ET

Today's Reading List

Here’s what the editors of Schools of Thought are reading today:

New York Times: Motivating Students With Cash-For-Grades Incentive
Motivating students to learn is an issue classroom teachers face around the world. The debate over paying students for their academic achievements spans from New York City to Abu Dhabi.

LA Times: : Survey finds ethnic divide among voters on DREAM Act
California recently passed its own DREAM Act, which allows undocumented California students to receive aid to attend certain colleges. Latinos and whites, as well as Democrats and Republicans, are split on their opinions of the new law.

Education Week: N.J. Gov. Wants Math, Science Teachers Paid More Than P.E. Teachers
In response to a software engineer's question about STEM education, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie says that a math or science teacher is "more valuable than the gym teacher". The state's teacher's union says all teachers are equally valuable.

Bloomberg Businessweek: Rhodes Scholarships Go to 5 at Stanford, Most for School
College students from around the world compete for the opportunity to study at the University of Oxford. The scholarship revealed its winners this week, including 32 from U.S. colleges and about 80 students from colleges in 14 other nations.

USA Today: Eight risky things you should absolutely do while in college
A Wake Forest college student provides advice for college. Among other things, she argues that failure is actually an option.

NCAA says it will examine how Penn State has handled scandal
November 21st, 2011
10:56 AM ET

NCAA says it will examine how Penn State has handled scandal

(CNN) - The NCAA says it will examine Penn State's "institutional control" of its athletics department and how it has handled the child sex abuse scandal that has tainted top university officials.

"The recount of these tragic events in the grand jury report is deeply troubling," the group's president, Mark Emmert, said in a letter to the university. "If true, individuals who were in a position to monitor and act upon learning of potential abuses appear to have been acting starkly contrary to the values of higher education, as well as the NCAA."

"While the criminal justice process clearly takes precedence over any NCAA actions, the association is closely monitoring the situation," the NCAA said.

Former President Graham Spanier and longtime football coach Joe Paterno were removed from their posts earlier this month by the school's board of trustees.

FULL STORY
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