January 13th, 2012
04:30 PM ET

Poor air quality in schools sickens kids

Programming note: For more about environmental health issues in the classroom, watch Dr. Sanjay Gupta's report "Toxic Schools" on "CNN Presents" this Saturday and Sunday at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET on CNN.

(CNN) - As a third-grader in Winsted, Connecticut, last year, Matthew Asselin was sick - a lot. He was lethargic and plagued with a persistent wet cough, respiratory infections and painful headaches.

As the school year wound down, Matthew's health worsened. He was out for two weeks in the spring with pneumonia and then developed a sinus infection so severe he needed to spend the night at the hospital, where he received intravenous antibiotics and breathing treatments.

In all, Matthew missed 53 days of school.
Five checkpoints for school air safety Five checkpoints for school air safety

But over the summer, a strange thing happened. Matthew was healthy. He was energetic. He could ride his bike for hours at a time.

"When we put him back in school this year, within three weeks, he missed 10 days with a respiratory infection," Melissa Asselin said. That's when Matthew's mother had an a-ha moment.

"When he was out of school, he was well. When he was in school, he became ill," Asselin said.

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Filed under: Kids' health • video
January 13th, 2012
04:28 PM ET

Exclusive: Doctors cheated on exams

By Scott Zamost, Drew Griffin and Azadeh Ansari, CNN

Programming note: "Prescription for Cheating" will air on "CNN Presents" this Saturday and Sunday, January 14 and 15, at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET on CNN.

(CNN) - For years, doctors around the country taking an exam to become board certified in radiology have cheated by memorizing test questions, creating sophisticated banks of what are known as "recalls," a CNN investigation has found.

The recall exams are meticulously compiled by radiology residents, who write down the questions after taking the test, in radiology programs around the country, including some of the most prestigious programs in the U.S.

"It's been going on a long time, I know, but I can't give you a date," said Dr. Gary Becker, executive director of the American Board of Radiology (ABR), which oversees the exam that certifies radiologists.

Asked if this were considered cheating, Becker told CNN, "We would call it cheating, and our exam security policy would call it cheating, yes."

Radiology residents must sign a document agreeing not to share test material, but a CNN investigation shows the document is widely ignored. Dozens of radiology residents interviewed by CNN said that they promised before taking the written test to memorize certain questions and write them down immediately after the test along with fellow residents.

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Filed under: After High School • Cheating
January 13th, 2012
04:04 PM ET

YNN Albany: Dog works as school's crossing guard

A German shepherd black lab mix is a New York school district's newest crossing guard. YNN Albany reports.

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Filed under: video
January 13th, 2012
01:20 PM ET

STEM stories this week on CNN Student News

(CNN) – Here are some recent Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math stories covered on CNN Student News.

Transcript

Transcript

Transcript

CNN Student News is a commercial-free, ten-minute news program for middle and high school students. In addition, we offer Daily Discussion questions and a weekly Newsquiz aligned with several of our news stories.



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Filed under: CNN Student News • Practice • Science • STEM • Technology • video
Teacher joins triathalon team to battle diabetes
January 13th, 2012
12:45 PM ET

Teacher joins triathalon team to battle diabetes

Every day this week, we've introduced you to one member of the 2012 Fit Nation Triathlon Challenge team. Today, meet Carlos Solis, an elementary school teacher who is trying to avoid what his family's history of diabetes might have in store for him.

Hi, my name is Carlos Solis. I am 49 years old, married for 28 great years and have three beautiful children, ages 20, 18 and 7.

I have been an elementary public school teacher for almost 14 years. Prior to that, I held down a few jobs, including serving in the U.S. Air Force, but none have been more challenging or rewarding than being in the classroom.

A few years ago, I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. I come from a family of diabetics, including aunts, uncles and, more significantly, my mom and older brother. My mom passed away several years ago and my brother is currently suffering from complications of kidney failure. He is on dialysis three days a week and has had several surgeries to help him get through. He recently has lost sight from his left eye and has very limited vision in his right.

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Filed under: Teachers
January 13th, 2012
12:10 PM ET

Homeless teen finds success, sees future in science

by the CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) - For two and a half years, Samantha Garvey has immersed herself in New York's Long Island salt marshes - prodding, examining and questioning, all in the name of science.

But after a hard day's work, at school or in the field, the high school senior hasn't been able to head home at night. That's because she doesn't have a home.

The 17-year-old has not let living in a homeless shelter deter her from her dreams. On Wednesday, she was named one of 300 semifinalists in the prestigious Intel Science Talent Search, putting her in contention to earn a $100,000 college scholarship.

"She is very special," her father, Leo Garvey, told HLN's Jane Velez-Mitchell on Thursday night. "She's a hard worker, very driven and dedicated to anything and everything that she does."

Along with her studies at Brentwood High School, situated about half the length of Long Island some 45 miles east of New York, Samantha Garvey has spent much of her spare time working with marine biologists.

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January 13th, 2012
09:30 AM ET

My View: Remembering Dr. King and the movement for civil and human rights

Courtesy Casey Elaine McDaniel/Caselove, LLC by Vicki Crawford, Special to CNN

Editor’s Note:  Vicki Crawford  holds a Ph.D. from Emory University in American Studies, concentrating in 20th century African-American studies.  Crawford is the director of the Office of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection, where she is developing campus-based programming in support of the collection.

As we approach the 26th annual Martin Luther King, Jr. observance and reflect upon the recent opening and dedication of a national memorial in King’s honor, we should consider how we might engage a living legacy of the human rights leader that brings us closer to the democratic vision he so passionately embraced.  A first step is to commit ourselves to teaching and learning about the civil rights movement, one of the most transformative democratic freedom struggles of modern times. Often, in  schools and colleges around the nation,  the movement is reduced to a few days of study and over-emphasis on a master narrative that is simplistic in its failure to interrogate the  many complexities and nuanced interactions among its leaders, participants and organizations.  A recent study revealed that American students have very limited knowledge of this significant period in the nation’s history which continues to impact events around the globe.

Students may recognize King’s “I have a Dream Speech” and know about Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus, but few would recognize King’s important sermons and speeches delivered during the later years of his life. Would they comprehend King’s courageous stand against the Vietnam War? What about his incisive critique of economic disparities which led him to rally to the cause of sanitation workers in Memphis, Tennessee?  As educators, we have a responsibility to connect young people to our past; we must give them  knowledge, understanding and appreciation for  the  triumphs and failures of this period in American history. We should teach the movement with emphasis on both leaders and followers, and include the often neglected, but indispensible contributions of women. Also, we should point out how children and young people were pivotal to societal change, especially college students and others who were active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.
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