Census report reveals education milestone
February 24th, 2012
02:37 PM ET

Census report reveals education milestone

By Donna Krache, CNN

(CNN) - In March 2011, for the first time ever, more than 30% of adults older than 25 had a college degree, according to information released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.  As recently as 1998, less than one-quarter of Americans older than 25 held a degree.

The findings are published in a new report, "Educational Attainment in the United States: 2011." This was one in a series of educational reports released today.

“This is an important milestone in our history,” Census Bureau Director Robert Groves said. “For many people, education is a sure path to a prosperous life. The more education people have the more likely they are to have a job and earn more money, particularly for individuals who hold a bachelor's degree.”

The Census Bureau also published "Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009." This report reveals that in 2009, 85% of adults age 25 or older had at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. It also states that workers with a bachelor’s degree had median earnings of $47,510, about $20,000 more than workers with a high school diploma, who earned about $26,776, and nearly $25,000 more than those with a GED, who earned $22,534.

The other available reports are:

The "Field of Bachelor’s Degree in the United States: 2009" which provides information on different majors and geographic and earnings data across those fields and "What It’s Worth: Field of Training and Economic Status in 2009," which looks at the relationship between educational attainment, field of training and eventual occupation and earnings.

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Filed under: After High School • College • Issues • Practice
February 24th, 2012
01:15 PM ET

STEM stories on CNN Student News

(CNN) – Here are some Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math stories covered recently on CNN Student News.

Transcript

Transcript

Transcript

CNN Student News is a commercial-free, ten-minute news program for middle and high school students. In addition, we offer Daily Discussion questions and a weekly Newsquiz aligned with several of our news stories.



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Filed under: CNN Student News • Practice • Science • STEM • Technology • video
Cheating scandal turns foes into allies
February 24th, 2012
06:10 AM ET

Cheating scandal turns foes into allies

Listen to CNN Radio's podcast Jim Roope tell the story of how the former head of the teachers union (who very much disliked charter schools) will now become its principal. And he is getting help from a former school board member who disliked the teachers union as much as the former union head once disliked charters.

By Jim Roope, CNN

(CNN) A cheating scandal at a Los Angeles charter school system last year has resulted in an unlikely partnership in the creation of a new charter school system.

Last year, John Allen, the executive director of Crescendo Charter Schools, a six-campus charter school system in L.A., allegedly told teachers at all six schools to unseal the state standardized tests and create a lesson plan that teaches directly to the test.

Some of the teachers refused Allen’s request as they viewed it as cheating. First grade teacher Elise Sargent said their jobs were threatened if they didn’t comply.

“There was a lot of confusion going on,” said Sargent. “For a while there was a lot of undercover talks about how we are going to get this out. We needed to make sure the Los Angeles Unified School District knows about this,” she said.

Sargent said the hesitation came with the fact that the teachers at Crescendo were not unionized and so were not sure the union would help or protect them. Sargent said they braved a call to then teachers’ union president A.J. Duffy.
FULL POST

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Filed under: Charter schools • Cheating • Podcast • Policy • Practice