February 27th, 2012
10:28 AM ET

iReport: Bill Gates answers questions

Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates talks about the college experience and education for women in developing nations.

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Filed under: After High School • College • Issues • video • Voices
February 27th, 2012
06:15 AM ET

My View: American universities can't be exported

Courtesy Phil Channing/USC By C.L. Max Nikias, Special to CNN

Editor’s Note: C. L. Max Nikias has been president of the University of Southern California since 2010. He is internationally recognized for pioneering research in digital media systems and biomedicine. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

America’s research universities have been franchising their campuses overseas, in an effort to reach students in emerging markets that seem to promise an academic gold rush. These universities would better serve the national interest by revaluing the benefits of recruiting the best of the rest of the world to the United States.

The United States’ 50 best research universities have emerged as the American asset that other nations most envy. So it was only a matter of time before other nations would begin to encourage these universities to franchise the college undergraduate experience internationally, in the manner that corporations franchise their operations and products.

Yet the “brain gain” that has resulted from funneling top international students to American campuses has been a key reason the United States has kept its economic and technological primacy in recent decades. A Gallup study found that America's surprising economic growth over the past quarter-century could be traced back to some 1,000 key innovators, entrepreneurs, rainmakers, mentors and creative geniuses - some 60% of whom were foreign-born persons educated on American campuses.

And universities that ambitiously franchise campuses overseas assume a host of risks that may be unrelated to their original mission. Following the recent economic downturn, some American higher-education franchisers have begun to run into financial obstacles, in some cases shutting down without granting a single diploma. This poses lasting reputational and fiduciary risks to the franchiser.
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Census report reveals education milestone
February 24th, 2012
02:37 PM ET

Census report reveals education milestone

By Donna Krache, CNN

(CNN) - In March 2011, for the first time ever, more than 30% of adults older than 25 had a college degree, according to information released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.  As recently as 1998, less than one-quarter of Americans older than 25 held a degree.

The findings are published in a new report, "Educational Attainment in the United States: 2011." This was one in a series of educational reports released today.

“This is an important milestone in our history,” Census Bureau Director Robert Groves said. “For many people, education is a sure path to a prosperous life. The more education people have the more likely they are to have a job and earn more money, particularly for individuals who hold a bachelor's degree.”

The Census Bureau also published "Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009." This report reveals that in 2009, 85% of adults age 25 or older had at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. It also states that workers with a bachelor’s degree had median earnings of $47,510, about $20,000 more than workers with a high school diploma, who earned about $26,776, and nearly $25,000 more than those with a GED, who earned $22,534.

The other available reports are:

The "Field of Bachelor’s Degree in the United States: 2009" which provides information on different majors and geographic and earnings data across those fields and "What It’s Worth: Field of Training and Economic Status in 2009," which looks at the relationship between educational attainment, field of training and eventual occupation and earnings.

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Filed under: After High School • College • Issues • Practice
February 24th, 2012
01:15 PM ET

STEM stories on CNN Student News

(CNN) – Here are some Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math stories covered recently on CNN Student News.

Transcript

Transcript

Transcript

CNN Student News is a commercial-free, ten-minute news program for middle and high school students. In addition, we offer Daily Discussion questions and a weekly Newsquiz aligned with several of our news stories.



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Cheating scandal turns foes into allies
February 24th, 2012
06:10 AM ET

Cheating scandal turns foes into allies

Listen to CNN Radio's podcast Jim Roope tell the story of how the former head of the teachers union (who very much disliked charter schools) will now become its principal. And he is getting help from a former school board member who disliked the teachers union as much as the former union head once disliked charters.

By Jim Roope, CNN

(CNN) A cheating scandal at a Los Angeles charter school system last year has resulted in an unlikely partnership in the creation of a new charter school system.

Last year, John Allen, the executive director of Crescendo Charter Schools, a six-campus charter school system in L.A., allegedly told teachers at all six schools to unseal the state standardized tests and create a lesson plan that teaches directly to the test.

Some of the teachers refused Allen’s request as they viewed it as cheating. First grade teacher Elise Sargent said their jobs were threatened if they didn’t comply.

“There was a lot of confusion going on,” said Sargent. “For a while there was a lot of undercover talks about how we are going to get this out. We needed to make sure the Los Angeles Unified School District knows about this,” she said.

Sargent said the hesitation came with the fact that the teachers at Crescendo were not unionized and so were not sure the union would help or protect them. Sargent said they braved a call to then teachers’ union president A.J. Duffy.
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Filed under: Charter schools • Cheating • Podcast • Policy • Practice
February 23rd, 2012
01:47 PM ET

Black male teachers becoming extinct

By Allen Huntspon and George Howell, CNN

Atlanta (CNN) – Take a moment and think of all the teachers you had between pre-K and twelfth grade.

Now, how many of them were black men?

For most people, this question won’t take too long to answer. That’s because less than two percent of America’s teachers are black men, according to the Department of Education.

That is less than 1 in 50 teachers.

Terris King, 25, a kindergarten teacher at the Bishop John T. Walker School in Washington D.C., believes that for African-American children, having a strong role model in front of them can make a huge difference.

FULL STORY
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February 23rd, 2012
12:03 PM ET

Today's Reading List

Here's what the editors of Schools of Thought are reading today:

U.S. Department of Education: Putting the “E” in STEM during National Engineering Week
Secretary of Education Arne Duncan visited the launch of the new public-private partnership 100Kin10. The initiative looks to recruit 100,000 STEM teachers over the next 10 years.

The Educated Reporter: Will Raising School Attendance Age Lower Dropout Rate?
Although President Obama wants states to mandate that students stay in school until they are 18, many districts have trouble getting students who are already required to be there to actually show up.

Edutopia.org: Lights, Camera…Engagement! Three Great Tools for Classroom Video
Ron Peck offers three different ways to use video that will make social studies more engaging and student-centered.

Education News: More, Diverse Families Opt for Homeschooling in New Jersey
Across the state of New Jersey, more families are joining networks for socializing and sports as they homeschool their kids.

U.S. News: How and Why to Get an On-Campus Job
The authors offer some reasons for and advantages of working for the college you attend.

Grading teachers
New York State United Teachers President Richard Iannuzzi, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and New York City's United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew announce the agreement reached on teacher evaluation on Feb. 16.
February 23rd, 2012
06:10 AM ET

Grading teachers

By Donna Krache, CNN

(CNN) Last week a deal was reached between the New York State United Teachers (NYSUT) and the state’s Department of Education on how teachers would be evaluated.

The New York Times reports that the deal permits school districts to base 40 percent of a teacher’s review on how that teacher’s students performed on standardized tests (what’s sometimes referred to as “value-added” data), with half of that portion based on the student’s test progress from one year to the next.  The remaining 60 percent of the review will consist of “subjective measures”, including principals’ evaluations and observations.

Like 18 other states that qualified for federal grants under Race to the Top, New York was under a deadline to devise a plan to evaluate teachers, or lose this funding.

After the deal was reached,  Governor Andrew Cuomo is quoted as saying, “It’s a victory for all New Yorkers. Government works, and that makes this state a better state.”

Carol Corbett Burris, principal of South Side High School, disagrees.  In the Washington Post Answer Sheet Blog  she says she “was struck by the lack of logic and fairness” in the deal.  Burris, who was named the 2010 New York State Outstanding Educator by the state’s School Administrators Association, co-authored “An Open Letter of Concern Regarding New York State’s APPR Legislation for the Evaluation of Teachers and Principals” which has been signed by nearly 1360 principals opposing the use of standardized test scores to evaluate educators.
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Opinion: Will the court strike down affirmative action?
The Supreme Court will have only eight justices to hear arguments in Fisher v. University of Texas.
February 22nd, 2012
06:07 PM ET

Opinion: Will the court strike down affirmative action?

By Abigail Thernstrom, Special to CNN

Editor's note: Abigail Thernstrom is the vice chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights and an adjunct scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. She is the author, most recently, of "Voting Rights and Wrongs: The Elusive Quest for Racially Fair Elections."

(CNN) - The Supreme Court has just agreed to take on the case of Fisher v. University of Texas. Abigail Fisher, a white woman, argues that she has been a victim of the university's race-conscious admission policies; the university contends that its drive for racial and ethnic diversity is educationally enriching - a benefit to all students.

Will the ugly discourse that generally characterizes debate over racially preferential policies disappear with the wave of a magic Supreme Court wand? It seems unlikely. The issue is a cat with many more than nine lives. It arrived in the early 1970s and, despite many attacks, some of which have taken the form of amendments to state constitutions, it has survived in pretty fine fettle.

The court will have only eight justices to hear the arguments. Elena Kagan, having been involved in the case as solicitor general in the Obama administration, has bowed out of participation. Her absence, however, leaves five justices likely to express at least some degree of skepticism about the racial preferences given to non-Asian minorities in the admissions process.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Abigail Thernstrom.

FULL STORY
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February 22nd, 2012
05:21 PM ET

I am America: Hollywood High now a diverse high school

By Chuck Conder, CNN

Los Angeles, California (CNN) –For the better part of a century, Hollywood High School has been known as the high school of the stars: Judy Garland, Carol Burnett, Sarah Jessica Parker and James Garner are among the famous alumni.

But Judy Garland might not recognize her old alma mater today.

When she attended Hollywood High in the 1930’s the student body was almost all white.

Today, it is predominantly Latino, and made up of teens whose families came to America from every corner of the world. “Hollywood has always struck me as a place where it doesn’t matter where you are from,” said Principal Jaime Morales, who immigrated from Nicaragua. “You are welcome here.”

School valedictorian Karla Samayoa’s parents fled political turmoil in El Salvador. Though she was born in America, she still feels a strong connection to her Salvadoran roots.

Read the full story from the In America blog
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