June 12th, 2012
02:34 PM ET

Possible Chicago teachers' strike, lecturers vs. teachers, and children's emotions

Here's what the editors of Schools of Thought are reading today:

Chicago Tribune: 9 out of 10 CPS teachers authorize strike
As negotiations between union members and Chicago's school district continue, 90% of the city's unionized teachers have authorized a strike. The union and district have reached agreement on several items, but remain split on teacher pay and linking teacher salaries to student performance.

Education Week: Telling Is Not Teaching
Walter Gardner scoffs at the advice that some college professors give to public school teachers. Most college professors lecture, Gardner says, and wouldn't survive long in a modern K-12 classroom.

PsychCentral.com: Teachers Need More Training to Handle Children’s Emotions
A new study suggests that when dealing with children's emotions, teachers tend to rely on how they respond to their own emotions. The study's author suggests that learning how to deal with children's feelings should be incorporated into teacher training.

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Filed under: Behavior • College • Curriculum • Issues • Policy • Practice • teacher unions • Teachers • Today's Reading List
June 12th, 2012
12:30 PM ET

Perry on tough love for students

(CNN) - CNN education contributor Steve Perry responds to an English teacher's commencement speech that has gone viral.

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Filed under: Graduation • On air • Starting Point • video
My View: The moral imperative for education policy
In 2000, Jesse Jackson organized this march in Chicago in part to address school funding issues.
June 12th, 2012
06:05 AM ET

My View: The moral imperative for education policy

Courtesy Rainbow PUSH CoalitionBy Jesse Jackson Sr., Special to CNN

Editor’s note: Reverend Jesse L. Jackson Sr. is a leading civil rights activist and president and founder of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition.

(CNN) – It has been two years since the administration’s Race to the Top education competition was implemented, and scholars, advocates, practitioners and journalists are asking whether the program has been effective. From my perspective, this is the wrong question. We must instead determine whether a contest that provides support to some but not others is sufficient for addressing the structural inequities that make separate and unequal education a persistent fact of life in America today.

Race to the Top and other competitive grant programs are essentially designed to help those who can run, but our nation must be committed to lift from the bottom in order to provide equal, high-quality education for all children everywhere. Our present education policy does not meet this moral imperative.

Heralded as an innovative method for incentivizing states to adopt higher academic standards, “turn around” low performing schools, improve student and teacher evaluations, and recruit and train more effective teachers and principals, the Race to the Top contest is an inherently political response to the widely recognized need for education reform. It pretends to offer a solution for all when it provides only a band-aid for some.

Education policy based on the moral imperative of lifting from the bottom would address the systemic funding disparities that continue to plague schools in high-poverty neighborhoods. A legacy of the 1973 San Antonio Independent School District vs. Rodriguez Supreme Court decision, is that we continue to allow our public schools to be primarily financed through local property taxes. This is morally unacceptable, because property taxes are a function of the relative wealth of the surrounding neighborhood.
FULL POST

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Filed under: Issues • Policy • Race to the Top • Voices