A majority of states set different benchmarks by race
October 17th, 2012
12:54 PM ET

A majority of states set different benchmarks by race

By John Martin and Nick Valencia, CNN

(CNN) - Civil rights groups and some parents are concerned that new proficiency targets in several states are selling African-American students short.

A majority of U.S. states and the District of Columbia have set up different benchmarks for different groups, including racial and ethnic student populations.

Florida is the latest state to establish race-based standards. By 2018, 74% of the state’s African-American students must be proficient in math and reading. That is a lower standard than the state’s white (88%), Hispanic (81%) or Asian students (90%) are expected to reach by the same year.

On the surface, this may look like less is being expected of some kids. But there’s an explanation that’s rooted in how we assess student performance under No Child Left Behind.
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Filed under: NCLB • Policy • Testing
Students choose Obama in Scholastic mock election
Nearly 250,000 students participated in this year's Scholastic Student Vote.
October 17th, 2012
04:15 AM ET

Students choose Obama in Scholastic mock election

By Donna Krache, CNN

(CNN) The votes are in – among kids – and Barack Obama has "won" a second term as president.

Every four years, Scholastic Classroom Magazines conducts its presidential mock election for students.  The Scholastic Student Vote launched its first contest in the presidential election of 1940.  The students have been wrong only twice:  In 1948, they picked Thomas E. Dewey over Harry S Truman, and in 1960, they “elected” Richard M. Nixon over John F. Kennedy.

The results of this year’s election: Barack Obama – 51%, Mitt Romney – 45%.  “Other” candidates (who gathered 4%) included write-ins like John McCain, Paul Ryan, Ron Paul and Hillary Clinton.

And, of course, write-ins included some votes for “my mom” and “my dad.”
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Filed under: 2012 Election • Voices